Question Types (updated)

I spotted a conversation between Dave and Dafydd over on the forum, about question types in quizzes. These guys are two of Yacapaca’s most prolific authors, so if they don’t know, we have clearly not got the message across. So for reference, here’s the complete list. Bookmark it now for future reference!


The Yacapaca assessment question types


AKA “select your answer”. The original multiple choice question. Two to six options.


Two to six checkboxes, none, some or all of which need to be selected to earn the mark. Students earn half a mark for one incorrect box, quarter mark for two, and so forth.


AKA “gap fill”. You can specify multiple correct answers, and also target specific incorrect answers with feedback relevant to that particular mistake. Matching methods include case-tolerant and fuzzy match.

Multiple Choice Cloze

Students drag one out of two to six option words into a sentence.

Pair match (Drag’n’drop)

Students match two to six pairs of items. You can also use this to test for sequence.


Students place up to 6 items in sequence. Part-marks are earned for partially correct answers.


Students select a point on an image such as a map or diagram. Selection inside the area you define earns the point.

Short Text

Student answers can be up to 100 words long, and are marked using artificial intelligence. You will find Short Text questions in our Premium courses, but they are not available for your own authoring due to the complexity of setup.

Long Text

Student answers may be essays, images or videos. Peer marked using Structured Peer Assessment. Long Text assignments are not part of quizzes, but are separately assignable from within our Premium courses. They are not available for your own authoring due to the complexity of setup.


An A-level in Good Character? Yes, we can do that.

The Battle of Waterloo, it is said*, was won on the playing fields of Eton. Building character, not imparting knowledge, was traditionally seen as the primary task of the British public school and, subsequently, its state-funded inheritors. The quintessential attitude was sportsmanship. Not winning or losing, but playing the game right.


As time went on knowledge and skills came to be valued equally, as they should be, but somehow that pendulum just kept on swinging and now Continue reading

Analysing spelling errors

When students misspell a common word, what is driving the error? I analysed 35,000 Peer Feedback entries in which the student had intended to write “wrong” and found 1614 instances of misspellings – about 5% of the total.


wrong again

Of the misspellings,

  • 62% entered “rong”, a phonetic error
  • 27% entered “worng”, a typographical error.

My own spelling changed from atrocious to moderately good overnight, when a psychologist colleague taught me the visual spelling strategy. It looks like a good proportion of these students could still benefit from the same thing. The rest just need to learn touch typing.

Finally, we got our patent

And here it is. Patents are written in a language that is absolutely mind-numbing to the rest of us so I’ll forgive you for not reading it. Basically what it covers is our Thurstone Ranking approach to peer assessment system, which is absolutely unique in the world.

We applied for this patent four years ago so it has been a long slog to get it granted. You can imagine that corks are popping at Yacapaca HQ tonight.

Seven ways to implement differentiation in Yacapaca

My thanks to new member Yasmin Sheikh of Whitfield School in Barnet for asking why we show each question for 10 seconds before displaying the options. I realised that although we have worked like stink build opportunities for differentiation into every point of the Yacapaca process, I have never really explained them. Here, then is chapter and verse.
  1. Implicit differentiation: thinking time between question and options
    This gives students time to challenge themselves to get the answer before receiving the restricted possibilities of the options. This is a higher level of challenge, and it gives the student who manages it a great deal of confidence. You can gently encourage this by applauding the behaviour, but please don’t push students to do it if they don’t feel ready.
  2. Differentiation by time: Question speed
    Different students think at different speeds, but this does not correlate particularly with ability. Yacapaca times each answer from each student with an accuracy of Continue reading